Steve Saville

Market Analyst & Professional Speculator, Owner of The Speculative Investor

Steve SavilleSteve Saville graduated from the University of Western Australia in 1984 with a degree in electronic engineering and from 1984 until 1998 worked in the commercial construction industry as an engineer, a project manager and an operations manager.  In 1993, after studying the history of money, the nature of our present-day fiat monetary system and the role of banks in the creation of money,  Saville developed an interest in gold.  In August 1999 he launched The Speculative Investor (TSI) website. Steve Saville has  lived in Asia (Hong Kong, China and Malaysia) since 1995 and currently resides in Malaysian Borneo.  

Steve Saville Articles

There are some important similarities between the present and the 1930s. For example, in TSI commentaries over the past 6 months we've discussed the similarities between 1937-1938 and 2007-2008, both with regard to the economic situation...
The gold market analyses put out by the likes of Gold Fields Mineral Services (GFMS), the World Gold Council (WGC) and most major banks invariably concentrate on things like jewellery demand, new mine supply, and scrap supply. This means,...
Below is an extract from a commentary originally posted at www.speculative-investor.com on 2nd December 2007.
Below is an extract from a commentary originally posted at www.speculative-investor.com on 13th September 2007.
Below is an extract from a commentary originally posted at www.speculative-investor.com on 3rd April 2007.
Below is an extract from a commentary originally posted at www.speculative-investor.com on 8th February 2007.
Back in December of 2001, Robert Arnott and Clifford Asness published an interesting paper entitled "Does Dividend Policy Foretell Earnings Growth?". Arnott and Asness used more than 100 years of data in an effort to determine the...
Below is an extract from a commentary originally posted at www.speculative-investor.com on 29th August 2006.
Some of the words that are commonly used by economists and financial journalists create an inaccurate picture of what's really happening in the world. The words "inflation" and "deflation", for instance, are routinely used to describe...
Below is an extract from a commentary originally posted at www.speculative-investor.com on 12th January 2006. Some people are bullish regarding the short-term prospects for gold and gold stocks because they think the majority (the public...
The world’s gold supply increases by 2,600 tons per year versus the U.S. steel production of 11,000 tons per hour.

Gold Eagle twitter                Like Gold Eagle on Facebook