Chris Powell

Chris Powell Articles

Ross Norman, proprietor of venerable London bullion dealer Sharps Pixley, writes today, "Gold is struggling to find friends." Is Norman himself one? It apparently depends on the day.
In an essay at the Monetary Metals blog headlined "Backwardation, the Bank of England, and Falling Prices" -- the firm's vice president of operations, Bron Suchecki, offers an explanation of one of the anomalies of the gold market,...
Dear Friend of GATA and Gold: Oh, for a journalist who would put a few serious questions to Franco-Nevada Chairman Pierre Lassonde, former chairman of the World Gold Council, when he says, as he told Daniela Cambone of Kitco News this week...
Dear Friend of GATA and Gold: Our friend P.C. writes: "As a long-time GATA follower, I fully subscribe to the understanding that markets generally, and particularly the precious metal markets, are controlled to keep international exchange...
Cast your bread upon the waters, the Bible says somewhere, and pray that something comes back besides overweight seagulls. GATA does a lot of casting, usually without result, but you never know when and where someone will pick up on it,...
The Bank for International Settlements today refused to answer questions from the Gold Anti-Trust Anti-Trust Action Committee about the bank's activity in the gold market.
Dear Friend of GATA and Gold: There's a little progress this week in the field of gold market analysis, for in his latest commentary, headlined: "Motive, Means, and Opportunity, But No Crime" --
Dear Friend of GATA and Gold: In his essay this week, "The Case Against Gold as a Central Bank Asset" -- The economic historian and libertarian financial writer Gary North argues that central banks should get rid of their gold reserves.
Gold swaps by the Bank for International Settlements, Dave Kranzler of Investment Dynamics writes today, correlate inversely with the gold price. That is, the more gold is swapped by the BIS, the more metal is made available to bullion...
Fund manager, author, and geopolitical strategist Jim Rickards, writing for the Daily Reckoning, noted again yesterday that central banks can always create inflation by devaluing their currencies against gold.

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Minting of gold in the U.S. stopped in 1933, during the Great Depression.